Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Brisbane's Hale St Link is named Go Between Bridge


I was rather surprised yesterday while watching the news
to see Robert Forster wearing a hard hat.
Not something you see every day.
It was the announcement that the latest Bridge to span
the Brisbane river shall be named in honour of the
fabulous band that started here some 30 years ago.
There's a great little interview with Robert
to be found here
And this article from the Courier Mail.


BRISBANE'S Hale Street Link is now the Go Between Bridge
with ratepayers voting to honour one of the city's most
famous rock bands.
Ratepayers overwhelmingly voted for the name from 11
short-listed suggestions.
Robert Forster, who founded The Go-Betweens with the
late Grant McLennan in 1978, was thrilled with the
unexpected surprise and the tribute.
"My thoughts are that bridges are romantic and poetic,"
Forster said yesterday.
"If The Go-Betweens name is going to be lent to anything
then I think a bridge is perfect."

4 comments:

Darragh said...

Heh. I wrote something about that the other day - probably might be a bit contentious, but I really hate the name, despite liking the go-betweens (my argument is linked here.

Bob, Brisbane, Australia said...

You make a sound arguement darragh,
but i think almost any recognition of my heroes is better than none.
One would have to draw the line somewhere but a bridge isnt the worst thing they could name after the band. The name is clumsy and as you say most people here dont even know who the band is.

Peter said...

Wonderful tribute.I'd love to have one of the bridges connecting Manhattan to the Bronx similarly named.

Darragh said...

Bob - yes. I mean I'm not fanatically opposed to the bridge name, and am glad that in some way that Brisbane has chosen to recognise the significance of the Go Betweens. I think they had a better opportunity when the Grant Mclennan name was suggested for the Green Bridge at UQ. But ce la vie. At least those that count will know what it really stands for. And I really like the idea that it was popular vote that decided the eventual outcome.